PEO delivers intelligence, sensor and EW capabilities

The Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool (EWPMT) will allow for greater control and enhancement of EW capabilities. EWPMT capabilities include the ability to plan, coordinate, manage and deconflict electronic warfare (EW) activities, as well as employ assets to conduct offensive EW targeting, use of the Electromagnetic Spectrum and the ability to synchronize EW spectrum operations within the Cyber Electromagnetic Activities (CEMA) cell. | U.S. Army illustration

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The Army’s Program Executive Office Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors, or PEO IEW&S, headquartered at APG, provides critical support for Soldiers through a functionally aligned organization, poised to deliver high quality materiel development for time-sensitive requirements or more deliberate support as needed by our wide range of customers.

PEO IEW&S has six subordinate project managers: Aircraft Survivability Equipment; Sensors-Aerial Intelligence; Terrestrial Sensors; DoD Biometrics; Electronic Warfare & Cyber; and Distributed Common Ground System – Army. PMs work closely with their Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Capability Managers (TCM) so that they can execute Army priorities while aligning with the needs of users, and the PEO IEW&S headquarters works closely with the Centers of Excellence from Intelligence, Cyber, Mission Command, Maneuver, Maneuver Support, Aviation and Fires which the TCMs represent.

The customers and partners this portfolio engages with run the gamut from Army G2; Army CYBER Command; Cyber Center of Excellence; CG Intelligence CoE; Intelligence and Security Command; Space & Missile Defense Command; Communications-Electronic Research, Development and Engineering Center; Army Research Lab; MIT-Lincoln Labs and many more.

Tool Enhances Electronic Warfare Capabilities

As the use of electronic warfare has become more prevalent, land component commanders and their staffs require a capability that will allow them to become more adept in their understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum.

While the technology available to Soldiers within the EW realm has become increasingly sophisticated, the ability to manage the spectrum in which they operate has remained rudimentary. That’s where one of the Army’s newest programs comes in. The Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool, or EWPMT, (pictured at top) will allow for greater control and enhancement of EW capabilities.

EWPMT capabilities include the ability to plan, coordinate, manage and deconflict electronic warfare (EW) activities, as well as employ assets to conduct offensive EW targeting, use of the Electromagnetic Spectrum and the ability to synchronize EW spectrum operations within the Cyber Electromagnetic Activities (CEMA) cell.

DCGS-A Continues Improve Intelligence Capabilities and Equip Deployers

U.S. Army photo
U.S. Army photo

The Distributed Common Ground System – Army, or DCGS-A, Increment 1 collects, processes and exploits data and then disseminates intelligence across all echelons for Soldiers to develop situational awareness and strategies to accomplish their missions. The intelligence analysis and fusion systems improve Commanders’ ability to visualize, describe and direct actions on the battlefield.

So far this year, the Increment 1 Team has fielded Release 2 and trained Soldiers at the 1st Armored Division; elements of the 20th Support Command (CBRNE); elements of the XVIIIth Airborne Corps; and headquarters of the 1st Cavalry and 1st Infantry Divisions. The fielding priority now focuses on elements of the 82nd Airborne Division and the 1st Cavalry Division.

The Increment 1 Team is tackling the important mission of improving the DCGS-A user experience at the battalion level. The Team is taking two approaches to provide Soldiers at battalion the capabilities they need.

Aircrew, Passengers to Receive Bolstered Protection

U.S. Army photo
U.S. Army photo

In boxing even the most explosive fighter has to be leery of a cunning counterpuncher who can attack with just the right amount of finesse to render them unconscious. This is the same theory behind the threats that Army aviators face. Man Portable Air Defense Systems, or MANPADS, serve as a prime threat to U.S. aircraft, so it becomes vital that the aviation community is provided with technology that will keep them one-step ahead of adversaries.

In addressing this concern, aircrew on all rotary-wing, tilt-rotor, and small fixed wing aircraft across the Defense Department will be afforded a new layer of protection from MANPADS with the addition of the Common Infrared Countermeasure (CIRCM) system. The CIRCM acquisition consists of a laser-based countermeasure that will be fully integrated with the ASE suite to include passive missile warning, an improved countermeasures dispenser, and advanced expendables.

PM Biometrics Transitions to PEO IEW&S

U.S. Army photo
U.S. Army photo

The portfolio for the PEO IEW&S grew this past year with the transition of PM DOD Biometrics to the PEO.

Combining Biometric programs with the numerous situational awareness systems PEO IEW&S is already responsible for greatly bolsters the enterprise approach to keeping Soldiers safe from immediate threats while also increasing the understanding of the battlefield for commanders. The transition serves as a homecoming of sorts; several PM Biometrics capabilities were once a part of the PEO IEW&S portfolio to include the Biometrics Automated Toolset.

Enabling Rapid and Accurate Long-Range Target Identification in Obscured Environments

Ground platform operators require the ability to rapidly and accurately identify entities (outside of the range of enemy fire or detection) within the operating environment. The Forward Looking Infrared, or FLIR, enables them to do just that.

U.S. Army photo
U.S. Army photo

The FLIR is a camera that senses infrared radiation (typically emitted from a heat source), to create images that are then assembled for video output. These images may then be used to steer their vehicles or to find and engage targets in obscured environments, such as night or fog.

With the FLIR, Soldiers have the ability to conduct driving, target acquisition, reconnaissance and surveillance, and situational awareness operations at any time of day or night, and in the presence of man-made and natural obscurants. As such, the FLIR has enabled the Army to “Own the Night.”

Army Airborne ISR Bolstered by EMARSS

Photo courtesy of Boeing
Photo courtesy of Boeing

Addressing the increasing demand for situational awareness was a key factor behind the Army’s recent addition to its Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance portfolio with the fielding of Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System known as EMARSS.

EMARSS provides a persistent airborne multi-intelligence capability to detect, locate, classify/identify and track targets in day and night, near-all-weather conditions with a high degree of timeliness and accuracy.

Since coming on line EMARSS aircraft have already contributed to the operational mission with deployments in support of two combatant commands.