ECBC leaders receive senior service pins

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s incoming Director of Research and Technology Dr. Eric Moore receives his Senior Executive Service pin from his wife, April Moore, during a ceremony on APG South (Edgewood), Nov. 10, 2016. | U.S. Army photo

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, known as ECBC, held a combined Senior Executive Service, or SES, and Senior Research Scientist, or ST, ceremony at the conference center on APG South (Edgewood), Nov. 10.

Incoming Director of Research and Technology Dr. Eric Moore received his SES pin, and the newly appointed Senior Research Scientist for Bioengineering Dr. Peter Emanuel received his ST pin.

ECBC Director Dr. Joseph Corriveau officiated the event, and Col. Thomas Saltysiak, served as Master of Ceremonies. Maj. Gen. Cedric Wins, commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, gave remarks and administered the Oath of Office to each honoree.

The families of both Moore and Emanuel looked on with visible pride as the Oath was administered, and as Corriveau attached a pin to each man’s lapel.

In his welcoming remarks, Corriveau pointed out the depth and breadth of the scientific knowledge of both Moore and Emanuel.

“I’ve known Dr. Moore more than 20 years. What a scientist! He has the ability to discuss any aspect of science, and he is perfect for this job.”

Much like Moore, Emanuel has a track record of scientific accomplishments.

Newly appointed ECBC Senior Research Scientist for Bioengineering Dr. Peter Emanuel receives his Senior Research Scientist flag during a ceremony on APG South, Nov. 10, 2016. | U.S. Army photo
Newly appointed ECBC Senior Research Scientist for Bioengineering Dr. Peter Emanuel receives his Senior Research Scientist flag during a ceremony on APG South, Nov. 10, 2016. | U.S. Army photo

“Dr. Emanuel has done amazing things at ECBC,” Corriveau said. “From managing large, complex international projects such as Project JUPITR in Korea, to miniaturizing genomic sequencing using the MiniION, a device that fits in the palm of your hand. This is an honor and I am proud to be officiating this.”

During his remarks, Wins added, “As a commanding general, what I’ve been struck by is what these two men do every day to empower, unburden and protect the warfighter. We recognize that their performance over their careers has led to this point.”

Moore and Emanuel gave heartfelt thanks to their families for helping them to reach senior level federal service.

“If you have good people around you, you are very fortunate, and I have been extremely fortunate to have this family behind me. I call them Team Moore,” Moore said.

For his part, Emanuel pointed out that most of his family either has or is in the process of getting a Ph.D. in science, making scientific research, “the family business.”

“We’re here for a reason, to make a commitment to life, be of service, to make this world better,” reflected Moore. Turning to his family, he added, “I want to make you proud and do more with each step.”

Emanuel said, “This new position allows me to give back to the nation the powers that God gave me.”

Senior Executive Service

The Senior Executive Service was established in 1978 to be a corps of executives to serve in key governmental positions not filled by top presidential appointees. It is the highest civilian service in the government and is extended only to those federal employees who demonstrate professional integrity, a broad perspective, and a commitment to the highest ideals of public service. The SES Corps is comprised more than 7,000 members. The Department of Defense employs approximately 460 members of the SES, who are accorded general officer status.

Senior Research Scientist

The Senior Research Scientist is a unique category of federal job established in 1990 to replace GS-16, 17, and 18 of the General Schedule. It covers non-executive positions classified above the GS-15 level that involve performance of high-level research and development in the physical, biological, medical, or engineering sciences, or a closely-related field. ST positions may include some supervisory and related managerial duties, provided that these duties occupy less than 25 percent of the incumbent’s time. There are fewer than 500 STs in the entire federal government, and many of the federal government’s most renowned scientists and engineers serve in ST positions.