Commander’s Corner – Gold Star Mothers and Families Day

(From left) Dianne Crawford and Maj. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford, APG senior commander, pause for a photo with Janice Chance, president of the Maryland chapter of the American Gold Star Mothers, during the Surviving Families Luncheon at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, March 9, 2016. (Courtesy photo)

By Maj. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford, APG Senior Commander

Sunday, Sept. 25 is a day of remembrance to pause and reflect in honor and support of over 75,000 Gold Star Mothers and Families. We pause to pay respect for their sacrifice and the sacrifice their service member made in defense of our great Nation. We open our hearts and lend support as a way to help them continue to be a resilient legacy for their loved one. Gold Star Mothers and Families must never be forgotten.

The term “Gold Star” stems from a World War I tradition.  Families with members in the service, would display a flag bearing a blue star for each member of the family in service. That blue star was replaced with a gold star to honor those who died in service to our Nation. The county and our Army will always be indebted to Gold Star Mothers and Families for their resiliency in the face of their loss and their service member’s ultimate sacrifice.  This day serves as an opportunity to pay our respects in tribute to the fallen.

(From left) Dianne Crawford and Maj. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford, APG senior commander, pause for a photo with Janice Chance, president of the Maryland chapter of the American Gold Star Mothers, during the Surviving Families Luncheon at APG, March 9, 2016. (Courtesy photo)
(From left) Dianne Crawford and Maj. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford, APG senior commander, pause for a photo with Janice Chance, president of the Maryland chapter of the American Gold Star Mothers, during the Surviving Families Luncheon at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, March 9, 2016. // Courtesy photo

While today is dedicated to remembrance, Gold Star Mothers and Families are an important and ongoing part of today’s Army. They remain vital and active members of our Army community, a symbol of resilience and perseverance. Our community and our services remain open to them for as long as they desire. They are symbols of honor and great emotion easily associated with the untold risks and perils our military — their sons, daughters or other relatives — face each and every day. They might wear lapel pins or other symbols representing their ongoing resiliency; they may not. If you see such a symbol please understand and show them the appropriate respect, a simple acknowledgement that he or she has lost a loved one in service to our Nation.

As an active duty Soldier and as parents of a Soldier, Dianne and I are acutely aware of the risks and perils faced by our loved ones as they stand point, often in harm’s way, protecting the life and liberties America holds dear. So please join us in saluting what I consider to be national treasures and pillars of strength and resiliency …Our beloved Gold Star Mothers and Families.

Trusted Professionals, Professionals Always – Army Strong!